Facing a big, fat, scary thing as a perfectionist

Friends! This week I was featured on the Couragemakers podcast. I had a blast talking to the host Meg Kissack about starting The Gratefulist, practicing gratitude, and letting go of my perfectionism. This was my very first podcast interview and so it was both scary and exciting (scaxciting?). I was excited to talk to Meg, but the prospect of talking about myself for an hour kinda freaked me out.

The thing about dealing with perfectionism is that, even though you can manage it on a day-to-day basis, when something new happens those perfectionist tendencies come back in full force. It’s ironic that having to speak about my perfectionism resulted in the perfectionist voices in my head having a field day.

A podcast interview was a big, fat, scary thing for me. Writing about it now and sharing my insecurities has me feeling like I’m having a bad vulnerability hangover. But… I’ve made it my mission to share with you my ups AND downs on this quest to let go of perfectionism and embrace imperfection and so I’m doing just that. Warts and all.

Now, your big, fat, scary thing might not be the same as mine, but it affects us the same. And so by sharing what I’ve learned, these lessons can hopefully help you out along the way too.

Okay, let’s do this! *fist bump*

I was featured on the Couragemakers podcast and got to talk about starting The Gratefulist, practicing gratitude, and letting go of my perfectionism. The thing about dealing with perfectionism is that, even though you can manage it on a day to day basis, when something new happens those perfectionist tendencies come back in full force. Now, your big, fat, scary thing might not be the same as mine, but it affects us the same. Click through to read the lessons I learned along the way.

PIN AWAY :)

 

DON’T BELIEVE YOUR LIMITING BELIEFS

 

I’m a true introvert. I prefer listening over talking. I don’t like to talk and sometimes feel like I can’t talk coherently. Still, I feel like I should be able to talk for a while about myself and my business. But the truth is, I have trouble doing that and expressing myself that way. I can write stories, but telling them is hard for me.

I’m the kind of person and friend that listens to you and asks you a ton of questions. So, this interview was a 180 degree role reversal for me. Confession time: when I’m way outside of my comfort zone I sometimes get a stutter, which I always think is waaayyy embarrassing.

The lesson here is to be mindful of your limiting beliefs. My limiting belief of “I can’t talk” is false. I AM able to tell a story. I DO have something to say. And my stutter is just part of my charm.

What are your limiting beliefs that stop you from doing that one big, fat, scary thing that you’ve always wanted to do?

 

REALITY CHECK YOUR EXPECTATIONS

 

One of the reasons my limiting belief affected me so much, was that conversations on podcasts always seem so flawless and perfect. It made me insecure and I felt like I needed to have a flawless and perfect conversation.

The thing is, though, what you see isn’t always what you get. Podcasts episodes are anything but the perfect conversations they seem to be. That’s why editing was invented. And there’s nothing wrong with editing away imperfections. Believe me, I’d do you a disservice if I published the unedited, first draft version of my blog posts.

When facing a big, fat, scary thing, do a reality check on your expectations and question whether something that seems perfect truly is the way it seems.

 
 
I was featured on the Couragemakers podcast and got to talk about starting The Gratefulist, practicing gratitude, and letting go of my perfectionism. The thing about dealing with perfectionism is that, even though you can manage it on a day to day basis, when something new happens those perfectionist tendencies come back in full force. Now, your big, fat, scary thing might not be the same as mine, but it affects us the same. Click through to read the lessons I learned along the way.
 
 

SPEAK UP

 

Several times during the interview I got lost in my train of thought, went off on a tangent, or got stuck stuttering.

A major lesson for me, which required a boatload of vulnerability, was to admit to Meg that I was struggling and that I needed a little help. It was the best thing I could have done. Meg is such a gracious and encouraging host and she steered the conversation back to the main points when I needed to and, in turn, I could do the same for her.

Saying you’re struggling is not a sign of weakness, but an invitation for connection. Asking for help is an opportunity to lift each other up.

 
 

DO IT ANYWAY!

 

Action over procrastination, FTW! Yes, that thing you’re facing is big, fat, and scary. Do it anyway, because that thing is also something that will liberate and empower you.

My perfectionism had a field day before the interview, but afterwards I felt nothing but connected and heard. Busting through our own limitations is the best feeling.

Are you ready to take action and let go of your perfectionism? Make sure to download my FREE 10+ page, step-by-step, perfectionism-busting workbook. Just click the button below!

 

Hi there! I’m Wendy, founder of The Gratefulist and host of the #perfectionistproblems community for recovering perfectionists. I’m insanely passionate about helping you let go of your perfectionism. Let’s chat about the hard stuff - like dealing with comparison, people pleasing, your inner critic & starting a perfectionist detox - so that you can stop caring so much about what other people think and finally take on those dream projects that you've been putting off for so long.